Ipv6

Enabling IPv6 Broke Functionality to My IP Security Cameras

Enabling IPv6 Broke Functionality to My IP Security Cameras

A cautionary tale of enabling IPv6 on all network interfaces/VLANs

After the long journey of learning more about IPv6 and how to enable it on my home network (see my page for detailed info), I discovered that I broke some functionality. When you have IPv6 enabled alongside IPv4 in a dual stack configuration, IPv6 will often take priority – after all, it is newest protocol intended to replace IPv4. I have created a network for my IP security cameras that is isolated from the Internet that I use as baby camera monitors.
How to Configure IPv6 in Your Home Network with ISP such as Comcast Xfinity

How to Configure IPv6 in Your Home Network with ISP such as Comcast Xfinity

Are you struggling to set up IPv6 in your home network? I completely understand...

Introduction IPv6 was drafted in the mid-1990s when it was realized that IPv4 addresses would quickly be exhausted due to the explosive growth of the Internet. Since the IPv4 protocol was originally a research project, approximately 4.3 billion unique IP addresses was considered more than enough. I doubt many imagined our current world where nearly everything would be connected to the Internet. Various techniques such as assigning smaller sized networks to organizations and the utilization of NAT (Network Address Translation) helped extend the time before IPv4 addresses would be exhausted.